6 Buildings You Did Not Know Were by Faculty Members

said by: Andrew Scott Campbell, (M.Arch 19’) 

 

Remember the first time you saw one of your teachers outside of their classroom? It can be quite the jarring experience. Something so simple as knowing a teacher does the simple task of buying groceries outside of the classroom can put in context a whole world of people outside ourselves. Suddenly, you look at your teachers in a new light. Knowing them better, not just as educators, but as living, moving, and growing people in the world. And so your world becomes bigger, more contextualized.

We wanted to take this opportunity to shed some of that same light on the people many of us have come to know over the past few years, not just as educators, thinkers, and researchers, but as doers.

The following is a short list of built works completed by the faculty members in and around DAAP. And while this list is in no way comprehensive, it may illuminate how we all think about the people who have helped shaped us and our work, making our world ever larger.

(In alphabetical order by building name)

 

altschul house by edward mitchell architects

In the wooded hills of Bridgewater, Connecticut lies a mid-century modern residence built in the early 1950’s with gorgeous views out towards its lush surrounding landscape. Before its most recent renovations, the CMU block and wood frame house had been closed off from visual connections to a downhill ravine and needed major mechanical and programmatic rehabilitation. Designed in phases, the residence was reworked from the ground up with completely new windows, exterior siding, heating and site drainage systems. A new master bathroom was added, as well as major renovations to the existing kitchen and baths. Later phases will include renovation of the existing garage to incorporate a new family room.

Photo: http://www.emarchitects.net/

Photo: http://www.emarchitects.net/


artichoke by terry boling architect

Photo: http://www.terryboling.com/

Photo: http://www.terryboling.com/

In the quaint, historic Findlay Market area of Over-the-Rhine sits a once abandoned three story Italianate structure, now incorporating a new first floor retail cookware space and two apartment units connected by an exterior stair and balcony structure made of perforated steel. The balcony structure also provides sun shading for the south facade and egress from the ground floor, a contentious but tasteful feature when negotiating with Over-the-Rhine historic district design guidelines. The retail space occupied by Artichoke sports custom aluminum shelves and an acrylic back-lit wall to display its artisanal wares. The building is expected to receive LEED gold certification.


fernald visitor center and nature preserve by glaserworks

The existing steel warehouse structure once sat within a one thousand acre site that was used as a uranium processing facility. It now stands as a visitors’ center for a remediated landscape consisting of a vast nature preserve of wetlands, prairies, and forests. The new structure houses a community meeting room, offices, and an exhibition space that showcases images of the Cold War Era that led to its initial construction. A model of energy efficiency and environmental building, the visitors’ center utilizes geothermal heating, high-efficiency electrical, water, and plumbing fixtures, as well as a bio-wetland that processes all of the building’s wastewater. Conceptual building design was completed by a team of faculty at the University, including John E. Hancock, Ericka Hedgecock, and Virginia Russell.

Photo: http://glaserworks.com/

Photo: http://glaserworks.com/


la poste by synthesis

Photo: http://synthesisarchitecture.com/

Photo: http://synthesisarchitecture.com/

If you’ve ever spent an afternoon on Clifton’s Ludlow Avenue, you’ve probably noticed troves of classy-looking urbanites standing and sitting outside of La Poste enjoying a glass of wine and eating delicious gourmet food. Little would you know that the restaurant owes its chic atmospheric quality to the perspectives of the designers at Sythesis, including professional development and co-op advisor Alex Christoforidis. The restaurant takes several cues from its original existence as a post office, showing off its refurbished ceiling and floor surfaces and allowing natural light to flow in through its tall glazed storefront openings.


prospect green by michael mcinturf architects

Photo: http://www.mcinturf.info/

Photo: http://www.mcinturf.info/

Situated at the base of Cincinnati’s historic Prospect Hill neighborhood sits Prospect Green, a new 4-unit townhouse development.  While the idea of a contemporary structure might seem like a stark contrast between the native Italianate architecture of greater Mount Auburn, the building’s scale, massing and proportionality blends perfectly with its surrounding environment. Throughout its design, steps were taken to closely interpret roof lines, topography, and public zones of the neighborhood to blend in well with its community of older structures.  Prospect Green received LEED Gold accreditation in 2016 and won Best Overall at the AIA, Cincinnati CRANawards in 2017.


studio 161 by Design studio 161

Photo: http://www.designstudio161.com/

Photo: http://www.designstudio161.com/

When Jim Postell bought his Clifton residence built in the year 1911, a decision was made to retain, stabilize, and adaptively reuse the home’s existing two-level garage structure as a design/build studio from which to base the operations of Design Studio 161. Not only was this decision made for the sake of sustainability, but it provided an opportunity to develop a unique space focused on craft, revitalization, and a do-it-yourself sensibility. The redesign incorporates an ipe wood screen and decking system that softly shades the interior spaces from direct sunlight, a green roof assembly visible from the studio space, and a sense of place through careful choices of material that call attention to the surrounding environment and residence.


While this list is in no way comprehensive, it might provide some fresh insight into the professional works—and thus, lives—of the professors we know and love best.


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